Exhibition Sections

Room 1

- Sub-Neolithic and Minoan pottery (Room 1) 
The display comprises clay vases from various parts of Crete, dated to the Final Neolithic or Sub-Neolithic (3650 - 3500 BC), Prepalatial (3650/3500 - 2300/2150 BC), Neopalatial and Creto-Mycenaean (1700 - 1070 BC) periods, representative examples of various local pottery styles. The most distinctive exhibits are a bird vase of the 3rd millennium BC and an early Minoan ship model of the Middle Minoan II period (1900 - 1700/1650 BC).

- Stone-carving (Room 1) 
An important collection of Neolithic and Minoan stone vases, vessels and tools.

 

Room 2 

- Clay Models (Room 2) 
Clay models, mainly animals, deposited as votive offerings at Minoan peak sanctuaries.
- Seal-carving (Room 2) 
Exhibits include seals, scarabs and sealstones from every period of Minoan civilisation, made of stone, bone, or elephant or hippopotamus ivory. The most impressive artefact is the unique sealstone depicting a Minotaur, dated 1350 BC. 
- Jewellery (Room 2) 
Fine examples of Minoan gold-work are displayed, including cut-out sheets, pendants, discs with repoussé rosettes, earrings and double axes.
- Early Iron Age Pottery (Room 2) 
Clay vases of the Early Iron Age (11th - 7th c. BC). The Protogeometric clay bird askos of the 10th c. BC is an impressive example. Two giant Cretan Cretan pithoi with relief decoration in the Daedalic style (7th c. BC) are displayed in Rooms 2 and 3.

 

Room 3

- Metalwork (Room 3)
A display of typical Minoan metalwork (bronze vessels, tools and votive figurines of “worshippers”). Two objects stand out: a Minoan bronze bossed bowl of the 16th c. BC with a Linear A inscription, and a Minoan bronze dagger with an elaborate gold handle, dated to the early 2nd millennium BC.

- Various objects from different areas (Room 3) 
Exhibits include votive and storage vessels of the Late Helladic (1370 - 1065 BC) and Late Cypriot periods (1600 - 1400 BC). There are also clay and glass vases, figurines and metalwork of the Historic period from different parts of Greece. The most distinctive exhibits are the gold diadem with a Medusa head of the 1st-2nd c. AD and the Boeotian plank figurines of the 7th c. BC.

Konstantinos, Marika and Kyriakos Mitsotakis Collection

The rich and impressive Konstantinos, Marika and Kyriakos Mitsotakis Collection was donated to the Archaeological Museum of Chania in 2000. The objects on display comprise one-third of the Collection, the majority of Cretan provenance. The exhibits are presented in chronological order (late 4th millennium BC - 3rd c. AD), arranged in the following categories: Minoan pottery, clay models, stone-carving, jewellery, seal-carving, metalwork and varia (various objects from different areas). Among the many fascinating exhibits, the following stand out: a group of Minoan seals, including the only known sealstone depicting a Minotaur (1350 BC); a Minoan bronze bossed bowl of the 16th c. BC with a Linear A inscription; a Minoan bronze dagger with an elaborate gold handle, dated to the early 2nd millennium BC; an Early Minoan clay bird vase of the 3rd millennium BC; a Protogeometric clay bird askos of the 10th c. BC; Boeotian terracotta plank figurines of the 7th c. BC; a gold diadem with a Medusa head of the 1st-2nd c. AD; and two giant Cretan pithoi with relief decoration in the Daedalic style (7th c. BC).